Associated Oregon Loggers, Inc.
2015 Madrona Avenue, Salem, OR

Welcome to the Associated Oregon Loggers

Associated Oregon Loggers, Inc. (AOL) is the statewide trade association representing some 1,000 member companies engaged in the harvest and sustainable forest management of Oregon’s 30 million acres of forestland. “Logger and Proud of It!”

Introduction to AOL


Recent News

Oregon Timber Harvest from a Drone’s View

By Rex Storm, AOL Forest Policy Manager

 

AOL member logger Doug Schlatter Contracting, Inc. worked with his neighbor and aerial photographer Carl Schreiner to produce a couple videos showing a slice of Oregon logging.  It’s a fascinating view for those unfamiliar with Oregon logging!

 

One video shows the ‘Camas Blooms Timber Sale’ from above.  The action visits a commercial thinning timber sale on federal Bureau of Land Management forestland, located in the Camas Valley area southwest of Roseburg, Oregon.  This drone footage gives you the rare chance to quickly see cable yarding—using a mobile yarder machine, and a cable suspended radio-controlled motorized carriage, which pulls logs to a roadside landing work area.

 

The second video shows the Logger for a Day, Part 1 .  Take a look at some other action involved in forestry, logging and the business of growing and harvesting trees for valuable structural wood products.

 

The loggers are harvesting trees in a second generation forest of 40-year-old trees—thinning to remove some trees, while leaving other trees growing in the forest to grow into larger crop trees.  This forest has grown from an area clearcut logged just 42 years ago—in 1974.

 

A total 269 acres were harvested in 2016 on the Camas Blooms timber sale project.  Professional foresters designed the project prescription; and the 22-acre area viewed is engineered to leave 65 healthy trees per acre.  The federal landowner, BLM, sold the standing timber in the Camas Blooms Timber Sale to AOL-member company, 3H Forestry & Land Management, LLC, for $715,000.  The timber sale logged more than 30,000 trees, mostly Douglas firs and grand firs.


AOL Event Calendar